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A small group of farmers, both men and women, move at speed as they place peanut seeds in to the ground with small hoes, their skin gleaming like obsidian under a merciless midday sun. This is the Lunghi community, beneficiaries of the seed program provided by Cafod and Street Child.

Adikalie Dumbuya
Village Chief

“This is a very good project. We are very happy with it”

“We are 250 people in this village, and it has been established here for hundreds of years.”

“Our farm produces seeds which feed our village and give us financial independence. It also helps develop other local communities; we can help provide food and share knowledge to ensure they are able to feed themselves or sell produce too.”

“This community was not directly affected by Ebola, although I was the contact point for this area during the outbreak. It was frightening for anyone who became sick, and if you were sick you probably wouldn’t tell anyone for fear of going to hospital and not coming back.”

“Before the Lunghi’s worked with Street Child and Cafod, we had difficulty getting seeds. We would loan them from the Ministry of Agriculture or other local farmers, which could require walking up to 5 hours on foot. These loans usually have interest; for example if you bought one bag of seeds, you would normally have to pay back 2 or 3 bags. This makes it impossible to make the farming profitable or sustainable.

“We have had endless promises from our government over the years, and we had become distrustful after so much disappointment and frustration. We are so glad and appreciative of Street Child and Cafod- within three months of the project we had results, the first real help we have ever had!

I’m concerned about the quality of schooling we can provide. There is a temporal hut serving as our local school- not just for us, but for other villages as well. We built it on our own and I teach the children here 5 times a week. A permanent structure and some teaching suppo

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Cafod Project - Lungi Community - Kembia-5981.jpg
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Chris Parkes
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Contained in galleries
A small group of farmers, both men and women, move at speed as they place peanut seeds in to the ground with small hoes, their skin gleaming like obsidian under a merciless midday sun. This is the Lunghi community, beneficiaries of the seed program provided by Cafod and Street Child. <br />
<br />
Adikalie Dumbuya<br />
Village Chief<br />
<br />
“This is a very good project. We are very happy with it”<br />
<br />
“We are 250 people in this village, and it has been established here for hundreds of years.”<br />
<br />
“Our farm produces seeds which feed our village and give us financial independence. It also helps develop other local communities; we can help provide food and share knowledge to ensure they are able to feed themselves or sell produce too.”<br />
<br />
“This community was not directly affected by Ebola, although I was the contact point for this area during the outbreak. It was frightening for anyone who became sick, and if you were sick you probably wouldn’t tell anyone for fear of going to hospital and not coming back.”<br />
<br />
“Before the Lunghi’s worked with Street Child and Cafod, we had difficulty getting seeds. We would loan them from the Ministry of Agriculture or other local farmers, which could require walking up to 5 hours on foot. These loans usually have interest; for example if you bought one bag of seeds, you would normally have to pay back 2 or 3 bags. This makes it impossible to make the farming profitable or sustainable.<br />
<br />
“We have had endless promises from our government over the years, and we had become distrustful after so much disappointment and frustration. We are so glad and appreciative of Street Child and Cafod- within three months of the project we had results, the first real help we have ever had!<br />
<br />
I’m concerned about the quality of schooling we can provide. There is a temporal hut serving as our local school- not just for us, but for other villages as well. We built it on our own and I teach the children here 5 times a week. A permanent structure and some teaching suppo